How much do solar panels cost in 2022?

In 2022, solar panels in the U.S. cost about $20,498 on average. In this article, we’ll break down the cost of solar by system size, state, and panel brand, all of which can significantly impact the final number you pay.

What you’ll learn about in this article

Average cost of solar panels in 2022

The average cost of a solar panel installation in 2022 ranges from $17,538 to $23,458 after taking into account the federal solar tax credit, with an average solar installation costing about $20,498. On a cost per watt ($/W) basis, solar panel prices in 2022 average $2.77/W.

Solar installations are a unique product – just based on your state and the manufacturer of your chosen solar panels, average solar panel costs can vary widely.

Low-end cost $17,538
Average cost $20,498
High-end cost $23,458

A note about pricing: gross vs. net costs


Throughout this article (and all around our website), we usually talk about solar panel pricing in terms of gross cost, aka the cost before any solar rebates and incentives that can reduce the upfront cost of solar, or even get you some money back over time. For example, our cost per Watt ($/W) figures throughout the rest of this article are always the gross cost. This is because solar rebates and incentives aren’t always available to everyone. Even the 26 percent federal solar tax credit isn’t always available for everyone to take full advantage of – you need to have enough tax liability to claim the credit.


What impacts the cost of solar panels?

There’s a lot that goes into the sticker price a solar installer charges you. Solar installations are a unique product: the price you pay is heavily dependent on your unique situation and factors related to your electricity use and property. Here are some of the top factors to keep in mind that can and do influence the cost of solar panels for your property:

  • System size: The bigger your solar panel system, the pricier it will be. Importantly, the average per-unit price for solar decreases with increasing system size.
  • Location: Pricing varies by state as well, which is a result of both local quoting trends and system size differences – states that have a larger average system size will naturally have a lower average cost of solar.
  • Panel brand and quality: Like any product or appliance, solar panels come in varying quality which can be highly dependent on brand. 
  • Panel type: The type of panel you install (typically monocrystalline, polycrystalline, or thin-film) directly impacts the overall quality of your installation. Higher quality = higher prices.
  • Roof characteristics: The cost of a solar panel installation doesn’t just come from equipment. Your solar installer will also charge for the difficulty of the installation, and having a complex roof might make your system cost more.
  • Labor: Solar companies all charge different labor rates for their work. You may opt to pay more for a more reputable company with better reviews and a shorter timetable to installation.
  • Permitting and interconnection: While it’s not a large factor, paying for permits and your interconnection fee to the grid will add a little to the top of your total solar installation price.

System size

Perhaps the most obvious and influential factor in the price you pay for a solar panel installation is the size of the system you get. It’s pretty simple: a bigger system with more panels will cost more money than a system with fewer panels (and lower energy output). However, there’s also that Costco-esque relationship between system size and price, where a larger system has a lower average $/W. It’s like buying food in bulk – the overall price is higher, but the per unit price is lower.

Remember, while bigger solar power systems may cost more, they’ll also very likely save you more in the long run. If you install a 10 kW solar energy system that covers all of your electricity use, you might have to pay more out of pocket, but you’ll be cutting a significant monthly expense – your utility bill – and saving more money as a result. Zero-down, low-interest solar loans are becoming increasingly common, making it even easier to buy a solar panel system that can fully offset your electricity bill and maximize your solar savings.

Location

Solar installation costs also vary by your location, mostly by state. The spread of prices isn’t that wide and much of the differences by location are actually due to differences in system sizes and incentives, but it’s still something to keep an eye on.

We’ve analyzed quote data from our solar marketplace to understand solar panel system prices by state. But as we said above, system sizes tend to be larger in states with lower pricing, so it’s not always fair to compare a 10 kW system in Florida to a 10 kW system in Massachusetts. Their energy needs are just too different.

Cost of solar panels by state

State Solar panel cost: 6 kw system average Solar panel cost: 10 kw system average 2022 federal tax credit value (for 10 kw system) Average cost per watt ($/W)
Arizona $13,980 $23,300 $6,058 $2.33
California $16,140 $26,900 $6,994 $2.69
Colorado $18,780 $31,300 $8,138 $3.13
Connecticuit $18,360 $30,600 $7,956 $3.06
Washington D.C. $20,460 $34,100 $8,866 $3.41
Delaware $15,720 $26,200 $6,812 $2.62
Florida $14,640 $24,400 $6,344 $2.44
Georgia $17,940 $29,900 $7,774 $2.99
Iowa $18,120 $30,200 $7,852 $3.02
Illinois $17,880 $29,800 $7,748 $2.98
Indiana $19,500 $32,500 $8,450 $3.25
Louisiana $18,840 $31,400 $8,164 $3.14
Massachusetts $18,660 $31,100 $8,086 $3.11
Maryland $17,520 $29,200 $7,592 $2.92
Maine $15,840 $26,400 $6,864 $2.64
Michigan $18,600 $31,000 $8,060 $3.10
Minnesota $18,240 $30,400 $7,904 $3.04
North Carolina $16,500 $27,500 $7,150 $2.75
New Hampshire $18,360 $30,600 $7,956 $3.06
New Jersey $16,740 $27,900 $7,254 $2.79
New Mexico $19,260 $32,100 $8,346 $3.21
Nevada $14,640 $24,400 $6,344 $2.44
New York $18,960 $31,600 $8,216 $3.16
Ohio $16,080 $26,800 $6,968 $2.68
Oregon $17,340 $28,900 $7,514 $2.89
Pennsylvania $18,060 $30,100 $7,826 $3.01
Rhode Island $18,900 $31,500 $8,190 $3.15
South Carolina $16,680 $27,800 $7,228 $2.78
Texas $15,840 $26,400 $6,864 $2.64
Utah $15,780 $26,300 $6,838 $2.63
Virginia $17,100 $28,500 $7,410 $2.85
Vermont $17,880 $29,800 $7,748 $2.98
Washington $15,840 $26,400 $6,864 $2.64
Wisconsin $18,120 $30,200 $7,852 $3.02

NOTE: These ranges are system prices BEFORE the 26 percent federal tax credit for solar. Additionally, EnergySage does not currently provide quotes in all 50 states, which limits our ability to provide solar panel cost estimates in each.

In general, states where homeowners need to use air conditioning more often have more average electricity used per household. As such, some of the largest solar panel systems are installed in sunny, warm states like Arizona and Florida. Why does this matter? For solar installers, the larger your system, the less they will usually charge per kilowatt-hour (kWh). It’s like buying in bulk at Costco – you might pay a higher sticker price, but your per-unit costs are lower when you buy more at one time. We’ll dive into this phenomenon more below.

Back to solar panels. In the end, this very roughly translates to lower $/W pricing in warm states and higher $/W pricing in cold states. But in the end, total pricing is usually close to a wash – warm states have a lower price per watt, but larger system sizes, and cold states have a higher price per watt, but smaller system sizes.

Panel brand and equipment quality

Another way to break down solar panel price data is by the panel brand.

The price you pay for a solar panel brand is reflective of panel quality to a degree. For example, systems using SunPower panels see the highest average prices ($20,580 for a 6 kW system and $34,300 for a 10 kW system), and SunPower is known for producing well-made, high-efficiency products. 

Interestingly, there aren’t that many outliers when it comes to brand pricing, and most manufacturers generally see similar cost ranges. It’s important to keep in mind that when comparing system prices based on panel brands, there are so many factors aside from just panel manufacturer that impact the final system price – like installer experience, location, racking equipment, inverter brand, warranty and more.

Panel type

In general, monocrystalline solar panels are the highest-performing type of panel, and are often more expensive than polycrystalline solar panels. However, you may need to buy more polycrystalline panels due to their lower efficiencies, so your overall installation costs may not vary as much as you’d expect.
Thin-film solar panels are also an option, but aren’t often used for residential installations. For solar panel setups on RVs and campers, you may want to consider a small thin-film system.

Roof characteristics

The characteristics of your home and roof also play a part in your total solar costs. If you have a south-facing roof that slopes at a 30-degree angle, installing solar on your home will be relatively easier for your installer, as they can probably install all of your panels on a single roof plane that has optimal sun exposure (better, more direct sun exposure = fewer panels needed, which will lower your costs). Conversely, if your roof has multiple levels, dormers, or skylights, the additional effort to finish the installation may include additional equipment and installation costs.

Labor

Another piece of the solar installation puzzle is the company actually performing the job. Solar installers charge varying amounts for their services, and the final price they offer for an installation depends on measures like your installer’s track record, warranty offerings, and internal operations. You can imagine how a well-regarded solar installer with premium warranty offerings can charge more for an installation job, and it will be worth your money. 

EnergySage brings the best solar installers right to you on our Marketplace – check out our article on choosing an installer to learn how we vet installers, and how you can and should compare them against one another.

Permitting and interconnection

While equipment and labor costs make up a significant portion of your solar energy system quote, the cost of solar permits and your interconnection fees can also be a factor. Typically, you will have to obtain a few solar permit documents and pay a fee to get your solar energy system connected to the grid (known as “interconnection”). There is some exciting work happening in this area to keep the costs and time lag to getting an approved interconnection – the Department of Energy’s SolarApp+ is trying to make the interconnection process cheaper and quicker for everyone.

How do you pay for a solar panel installation?

Once you know the cost of solar for your unique project, it’s time to decide how you’ll pay for solar. There are three primary ways to finance a solar panel installation: a cash purchase, a solar loan, or a solar lease/power purchase agreement.

Generally, a cash purchase is right for you if you’re looking to maximize your savings from solar, you have enough tax liability to take advantage of the solar tax credit, or you have the funds available to pay for a solar panel system upfront.

A solar loan is right for you if you don’t want to shell out the amount of cash required to pay for a solar panel system upfront, you still want the most savings on your electricity bills as possible, and you would like to be eligible for all incentives and rebates.
A solar lease or PPA is right for you if you would prefer someone else to monitor and maintain the system, if you aren’t eligible for tax incentives, or if you’d just like to reduce and/or lock-in your monthly electricity bill.

Reduce your solar costs with rebates and incentives

We’ve been talking about factors that add on cost to a solar installation, but it’s also equally essential to consider the ways you can save with solar rebates and incentives. Tax credits, cash rebates, performance-based incentives (PBIs), and energy credits are all ways you can get money back on a solar installation. The availability of these types of incentives almost always depend on where you live – utilities, cities, and states all usually offer their own solar incentives to people living in their service areas.

The federal solar tax credit: solar’s best incentive

The best incentive for going solar in the country is the federal solar tax credit, or the investment tax credit (ITC). This incentive allows you to deduct 26 percent of the cost of installing solar panels from your federal taxes, and there’s no cap on its value. For example, a 10 kW system priced at the national average ($2.77/W) comes out to $27,700. However, with the ITC, you’d be able to deduct 26 percent of that cost, or $7,202, from your taxes. This essentially reduces the cost of your system to the $20,498 price tag we highlighted at the beginning of this article.

The cost of solar after installation


It’s not talked about as much, but one thing to keep in mind about the cost of a solar panel installation is the long-term maintenance associated with it. In general, solar panels require little to no maintenance over their lifetime, and you shouldn’t expect to shell out much money at all once your panels are installed and operational. There’s always the off-chance something happens that’s not covered by your warranties, however. You may need to trim trees as they grow, or hire a cleaner if you live in an area of the country with abnormal air pollution. Learn more about what you could run into post-installation in our article about the costs of solar panels after they’re installed.

How does a solar panel installation work?

Installing solar panels doesn’t happen overnight – there’s a process for what needs to happen to get your panels ready to begin powering your home. From the day you sign your contract with your installer, it will typically take between one and three months before your solar panels are grid-connected and producing energy for your home. We’ve outlined the five-step solar panel installation process below:

1. Choosing and order your equipment

The very first step in a solar installation is to choose your solar panels and inverters, and confirm with your installer so they can order it all for you. The two primary components you’ll need to evaluate for your system are solar panels and inverters. Durability, efficiency and aesthetics are the primary factors most homeowners will use to compare the various brands (other than price). Learn more in our guide to choosing solar equipment.

2. Engineering site visit

After you sign your solar contract, an engineer (likely an employee or sub-contractor of the installer you’re working with) will come by your property to inspect your home and make sure everything is compatible with your new solar system. 

During the visit, the engineer will evaluate the condition of your roof to ensure that it’s structurally sound. They will also look at your electrical panel – the grey box in your basement – to see if you’ll need to upgrade it.

3. Permits and documentation

As with any big financial decision, installing solar panels involves a lot of paperwork. Luckily, most of this paperwork is dealt with by the installer. They’ll help you apply for solar incentives and fill out any permits and documents you need to legally go solar.

4. Solar installation: the big day

The actual installation is an exciting day for every solar homeowner who wants to rely on renewable energy as opposed to a utility company. There are several individual steps to the actual installation day, including preparing your roof with racking, setting up wiring, placing panels and inverters, and attaching everything together. The timeline for the installation will range from one to three days, completely dependent on the size of the system you are installing.

5. Approval and interconnection

The final step of going solar is “flipping the switch,” so to speak, and officially commencing to generate power from your rooftop. Before you can connect your solar panels to the electric grid, a representative from your town government will need to inspect the system and give approval. During this inspection, the representative will essentially be double-checking your installer’s work. He or she will verify that the electrical wiring was done correctly, the mounting was safely and sturdily attached, and the overall install meets standard electrical and roof setback codes.

The bottom line: solar panels will save you money in the long run

At the end of the day, the cost of solar is only as important as the return you’ll get from installing solar panels. For most homeowners, solar is a worthwhile investment, and you can “break even” in as few as 7 or 8 years. From that point on, you’re essentially generating free electricity and racking up the savings. During those 7 to 8 years, you’ll be generating your own electricity instead of paying for electricity from the grid, and any extra electricity you produce you might be able to get credit for thanks to net metering policies (depending on where you live). And of course, this is without even considering the environmental benefits of solar.

You can read more about payback periods and the benefits of solar in our article, “Are solar panels worth it?”. Or, head to our solar calculator for an instant estimate of your savings potential!

Start your solar journey on EnergySage

The best way to get the most competitive prices for solar is to compare multiple quotes. EnergySage is the nation’s online Solar Marketplace: when you sign up for a free account, we connect you with solar companies in your area, who compete for your business with custom solar quotes tailored to fit your needs. Over 10 million people come to EnergySage each year to learn about, shop for, and invest in solar. Sign up today to see how much solar can save you.

core solar content
cost/savings content

195 thoughts on “How much do solar panels cost in 2022?

  1. Ella Mora March 14, 2022 at 10:55 am

    I agree with you. I believe that installation costs may get even cheaper while savings grow higher. The savings on your monthly utilities is substantial and the tax incentives are fantastic. Some states more than others. Your best bet is to get online quotes to shop and compare. A local provider will reply with a prompt quote. There is no need to overpay for the panels and install!

    Reply
  2. Troy January 16, 2022 at 6:11 pm

    Let’s cut to the chase. You say the cost of solar panels as of July 2021 is about $20,474, and you also say the total average installation cost ranges from $23,800 to $31,400 for a 10 kW system. So you’re basically saying a 10kw solar system + installation is $51,000? A 10kw solar panel array usually takes a team of 3-4 guys ONE DAY to install. So how do you justify that labor pricing? I’m in the process of getting quotes for solar and have found these “caring, environmentally conscious” companies to be nothing but bullshit. They are gouging people terribly! My first quote was $51,000. I figured up their material cost myself and it was only $21,000. This is why we’re not going to escape the doom of Climate Change. Greed. The Federal Government needs to regulate these sharks.

    Reply
    1. Solar buyer January 20, 2022 at 2:21 pm

      The description could be better, but these costs are for an entire solar PV system (panels, inverter, labor, BOS, profit). Solar panels by themselves only cost $.50-$.60 per watt. A normal system should cost < $3 per watt these days. I just got 3 quotes that ranged from $2.88/w to $3.91/w to $4.61/w for the same system. My takeaway is that just like for anyone in the construction trade quoting a custom job (or really for any business) it is buyer beware. Have to research the companies and get multiple bids. It has nothing to do with "caring, environmentally conscious companies" trying to bullshit anyone any more than any other profit motivated company pricing what the market will bear. Some are reasonable and some aren't. And solar IS a good thing for the environment! Government doesn't regulate industry pricing and control whether businesses charge higher prices than others unless they are monopolies. It is as simple as don't buy from the price gougers..

      Reply
      1. Jeff Worthington February 10, 2022 at 9:38 am

        So solar panels themselves should cost far more than 50-60 cents per watt unless they’re just absolute trash, bad warranty etc. A great midrange panel, with excellent price/production and efficiency ratios would be the Aptos DNA 360 watt. Its $2.5 per watt.

        Unless you live in California, the only reasonable quote there is $2.88, and even that is pushing it on the mid/high end.

        Consider a lot of the unseen benefits, excellent warranties, the invasiveness of the solution, deprecation of product production over time, lifetime monitoring of the systems, The management of the entire project from start to finish (HOA, labor, design, permits).

        These all cost a fair amount of money to provide and they aren’t going to charge 1:1 what it would cost you to do it. That’s what makes it fiscally sustainable at scale.

        The sales people can make a ton, or not alot at all. Sometimes they make 5% of total cost, sometimes 12% or higher. Its important to shop around not because solar companies scam you. but sales people do. There often aren’t any real red flags on any price above $5.00/watt. (at which point the actual lender may call you and warn you)

        Reply
  3. Kay Brainerd November 22, 2021 at 9:32 am

    My Sunpower inverter is not working and after trying for months to get a technician here to service it, I would like to know how much a new inverter costs.

    Reply
    1. jeff worthington February 10, 2022 at 9:39 am

      They should be replacing that for you. If its not warrantied at least 15 years, then you may have gotten an affordable deal in exchange for less support.

      Reply
  4. Asadullah October 14, 2021 at 1:05 am

    In Indonesia, solar panel price is decreasing.
    many people started to notice that solar panel is a technology that can help them to get electricity out of sunlight which is abundant in this country.

    Reply
  5. Irma October 7, 2021 at 1:28 pm

    You are a great impartial writer young man and wise beyond your years( saw pic). Truly most informative article for us folks who don’t even know what to consider other than price. Thk you.

    Reply
  6. cedar shingles October 1, 2021 at 8:55 am

    I came across your post about solar panels and I wanted to take a minute to say thanks for posting an awesome article. It’s well-written and the information is really useful!

    Reply

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.